Tuesday, February 24, 2015

$3.5 Million Comics!



The 1st Edition of Superman (which was only 10 cents in 1938) WAS SOLD IN A WHOOPING $3.5 MILLION DOLLARS!!!


A copy of “Action Comics No. 1″ created by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, and published in June 1938, features mild-mannered reporter Clark Kent in Metropolis and his crime-fighting alter ego, as well as other characters like Lois Lane.

The issue was put up for auction on eBay on Aug. 14, with parts of the final price going to the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation. Bidding began at $1 million.

Friday, February 13, 2015

The Last Peanuts.

On February 13, 2000, the day following Schulz's passing, the last ever Peanuts strip ran in papers. The strip began with Charlie Brown answering the phone with someone on the end presumably asking for Snoopy. Charlie Brown responded with "No, I think he's writing." The bottom panel consisted of the final daily strip in its entirety, reprinted in color, and included various Peanuts characters surrounding it. The very last strip consisted simply of Snoopy sitting at his typewriter in thought with a note from Schulz that read as follows:

Dear Friends,
I have been fortunate to draw Charlie Brown and his friends for almost fifty years. It has been the fulfillment of my childhood ambition.
Unfortunately, I am no longer able to maintain the schedule demanded by a daily comic strip. My family does not wish "Peanuts" to be continued by anyone else, therefore I am announcing my retirement.
I have been grateful over the years for the loyalty of our editors and the wonderful support and love expressed to me by fans of the comic strip.
Charlie Brown, Snoopy, Linus, Lucy...how can I ever forget them...
— Charles M. Schulz


Charles M. Schulz died on  February 12, 2000.

Little Niggy: Dog of the Dam

In 1932 a part-Labrador puppy with a jet black coat and a white blaze on his chest was said to have been born in the crawlspace beneath the first police building in Boulder City. A laborer for Six Companies, the joint venture of construction companies building Hoover dam, began bringing him to the worksite while he was still a puppy, and he became a welcome addition to the workforce. Political correctness did not occur to the men of the time, and they called the dog ”Nig.”

The dog was as sure-footed as any mountain goat and made his way around the canyon and on the construction catwalks that the men used to navigate the dam. Nig could climb up ladders and he followed the men into tunnels without fear.

He became Hoover Dam official builder dam\s animal mascot.

Unfortunately in 1941, Little Niggy was accidentally run over by a truck. He was buried in a concrete crypt near the Nevada abutment and memorialized with a plaque identifying him as a dog that adopted a dam.