Wednesday, July 22, 2015

The Women who Power NASA’s New Horizons Mission to Pluto

Women make up approximately 25 percent of the New Horizons flyby team. The female team members were photographed at Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory on July 11, 2015, just three days before the spacecraft’s closest approach to Pluto.

Kneeling from left to right: Amy Shira Teitel, Cindy Conrad, Sarah Hamilton, Allisa Earle, Leslie Young, Melissa Jones, Katie Bechtold, Becca Sepan, Kelsi Singer, Amanda Zangari, Coralie Jackman, Helen Hart. Standing, from left to right: Fran Bagenal, Ann Harch, Jillian Redfern, Tiffany Finley, Heather Elliot, Nicole Martin, Yanping Guo, Cathy Olkin, Valerie Mallder, Rayna Tedford, Silvia Protopapa, Martha Kusterer, Kim Ennico, Ann Verbiscer, Bonnie Buratti, Sarah Bucior, Veronica Bray, Emma Birath, Carly Howett, Alice Bowman. Not pictured: Priya Dharmavaram, Sarah Flanigan, Debi Rose, Sheila Zurvalec, Adriana Ocampo, Jo-Anne Kierzkowski.

Sunday, July 12, 2015

Panahon pa ni... Two Tagalog words that pertain to a time long ago.

Picture came from the Celistino Delfin Gaspar Family

The word "Panahon pa ng Kopong-kopong" is a Tagalog phrase which means "a very long time ago." The origin of the term "kopong" is an old Tagalog word for zero, so technically speaking, Panahon pa ng  Kopong-Kopong means 1900 and note the two "00" or "kopong." 

"Panahon pa ni Mahoma" means the time of Muhammad, the prophet of Islam. Mahoma is an alternative spelling of Muhammad's name.

Yet, there are others who say that Mahoma means the Japanese General Masaharu Homma. So Panahon pa ni Mahoma means a time somewhere in the early 40's during the Japanese occupation of the Philippines. 

Saturday, June 06, 2015


On the morning of June 5, 1944, U.S. General Dwight D. Eisenhower gave the go-ahead for Operation Overlord, the largest amphibious military operation in history. On his orders, 6,000 landing craft, ships and other vessels carrying 176,000 troops began to leave England for the trip to France. That night, 822 aircraft filled with parachutists headed for drop zones in Normandy. An additional 13,000 aircraft were mobilized to provide air cover and support for the invasion. By dawn on June 6, 18,000 parachutists were already on the ground; the land invasions began at 6:30 a.m. The British and Canadians overcame light opposition to capture Gold, Juno and Sword beaches; so did the Americans at Utah. The task was much tougher at Omaha beach, however, where 2,000 troops were lost and it was only through the tenacity and quick-wittedness of troops on the ground that the objective was achieved. This amphibious operation became the turning point for World War II in Europe. This famous battle is  called D-Day or the Invasion of Normandy.

Tuesday, May 12, 2015

The word jazz came from baseball.

It starts 100 years ago with an obscure baseball player named Ben Henderson.

Henderson was a washed up pitcher with the Pacific Coast League with a reputation as an unreliable drunk, so his career never amounted to much. But back in 1912, he told a reporter about a new pitch he had developed, and became the first person known to use the word “Jazz.”

Computer Bug

In 1945, Grace Murray Hopper was working on the Harvard University Mark II Aiken Relay Calculator. On the 9th of September, 1945, when the machine was experiencing problems, an investigation showed that there was a moth trapped between the points of Relay #70, in Panel F. The operators removed the moth and affixed it to the log. (See the picture above.) The entry reads: "First actual case of bug being found."

Sunday, May 10, 2015

Mother's Day

The earliest history of Mothers Day dates back to the ancient annual spring festival the Greeks dedicated to maternal goddesses. The Greeks used the occasion to honor Rhea, wife of Cronus and the mother of many deities of Greek mythology. 


Friday, April 24, 2015

First YouTube video

On April 23, 2005, at 8:27 p.m., YouTube co-founder Jawed Karim uploaded the first YouTube video “Me at the zoo.”